Flora Kong

Flora Kong

Personal information

Full name
Flora Kong Yan Kay

National team
 Hong Kong

Born
(1984-12-14) 14 December 1984 (age 32)
Hong Kong, Hong Kong

Height
1.60 m (5 ft 3 in)

Weight
46 kg (101 lb)

Sport

Sport
Swimming

Strokes
Butterfly

Club
Irvine Novaquatics (U.S.)

College team
University of California, Berkeley (U.S.)

Coach
Dave Salo (U.S.)

This is a Chinese name; the family name is Kong.
Flora Kong Yan Kay (also Kong Yan Kay or Flora Kong, Chinese: 江欣琦; pinyin: Jiāng Xīnqí; Jyutping: gong1 jan1 kei4; born December 14, 1984) is a Hong Kong former swimmer, who specialized in butterfly events.[1] She represented Hong Kong, as a 15-year-old, at the 2000 Summer Olympics, and later became a finalist in the 200 m butterfly at the 2002 Asian Games.
Kong competed only in the women’s 100 m butterfly at the 2000 Summer Olympics in Sydney. She achieved a FINA B-cut of 1:03.39 from the Hong Kong Long Course Championships.[2] She challenged six other swimmers in heat two, including two-time Olympians Hsieh Shu-ting and María del Pilar Pereyra. Coming from third at the final turn, Kong strengthened her own pace on the final stretch, but fell short to second place by more than half a second (0.50) behind Hsieh in 1:04.09. Kong failed to advance into the semifinals, as she placed forty-second overall on the first day of prelims.[3][4]
At the 2002 Asian Games in Busan, South Korea, Kong failed to medal in any of her individual events, finishing eighth in the 100 m butterfly (1:03.42), and eleventh in the 200 m butterfly (2:22.41).[5][6]
When she left Hong Kong to come to the United States, Kong trained for world-class coach Dave Salo at the Irvine Novaquatics Club, and helped the swim team set school records in all medley relays (both 200 and 400 m).[7][8] She also competed for the California Golden Bears swimming and diving team under women’s head coach Teri McKeever, and spent two years of undergraduate studies at the University of California, Berkeley.
References[edit]

^ “Flora Kong”. Olympics at Sports-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved 22 June 2013. 
^ “Swimming – Women’s 100m Butterfly Startlist (Heat 2)” (PDF). Sydney 2000. Omega Timing. Retrieved 14 June 2013. 
^ “Sydney 2000: Swimming – Women’s 100m Butterfly Heat 2” (PDF). Sydney 2000. LA84 Foundation. p. 224. Retrieved 19 April 2013. [permanent dead link]
^ Newberry, Paul (16 September 20
부천오피

Impuls 17

17

Role
Hang glider

National origin
Germany

Manufacturer
Impuls

Status
Production completed

Unit cost

€2850 (2003)

The Impuls 17 is a German high-wing, single-place, hang glider that was designed and produced by Impuls of Munich.[1]
The aircraft is no longer in production.[2]
Design and development[edit]
The Impuls 17 was designed as a beginner and school wing for flight training and is certified as DHV Class 2. It is named for its rounded-off wing area, which is 17.4 m2 (187 sq ft).[1]
The aircraft is made from aluminum tubing, with the wing covered in Dacron sailcloth. Its 10 m (32.8 ft) span wing is cable braced from a single kingpost. The nose angle is 120° and the aspect ratio is 5.7:1. Pilot hook-in weight range is 60 to 121 kg (132 to 267 lb).[1]
Specifications (17)[edit]
Data from Bertrand[1]
General characteristics

Crew: one
Wingspan: 10 m (32 ft 10 in)
Wing area: 17.4 m2 (187 sq ft)
Aspect ratio: 5.7:1

References[edit]

^ a b c d Bertrand, Noel; Rene Coulon; et al: World Directory of Leisure Aviation 2003-04, page 46. Pagefast Ltd, Lancaster OK, 2003. ISSN 1368-485X
^ Impuls (n.d.). “Die Impuls Flugdrachen GmbH hat die Produktion von Fluggeräten eingestellt. (German language)”. Retrieved 26 February 2012. 

v
t
e

Impuls aircraft

Hang gliders

14
17
IC

Graham Simpson (musician)

Graham Simpson

Born
(1943-10-13)13 October 1943
Manchester, Lancashire, England

Died
16 April 2012(2012-04-16) (aged 68)
London, England

Genres
Glam rock, art rock, blues

Occupation(s)
Musician

Instruments
Guitar, bass

Associated acts
The Junco Partners, The Gas Board, Cook-A-Hoop, Roxy Music

Graham Simpson (13 October 1943 – 16 April 2012) was a founding member and bassist of Roxy Music, and friend of Bryan Ferry. On their eponymous first album (1972), his bass notes made distinctive contributions to the tracks “Ladytron” and “Chance Meeting”. However, not long after the album was released, Simpson, who was suffering from depression following the death of his mother from cancer,[1] was given an open-ended choice to remain with or take a hiatus from the band by Ferry. Simpson chose to leave the band and never returned to the line-up. He used his band royalties to travel the world learning about different cultures and religions, particularly Sufism, returning to London in 1982.
He died in 2012.[2][3]
References[edit]

^ “Chapter III: Biographies – Roxy Music”. Delmere.de. 12 December 1971. Retrieved 24 August 2014. 
^ “Bryan Ferry – GRAHAM SIMPSON 1943–2012”. Bryanferry.com. Retrieved 24 August 2014. 
^ “Roxy Music – Musicians & Credits – on”. Vivaroxymusic.com. Retrieved 27 August 2012. 

v
t
e

Roxy Music

Bryan Ferry
Andy Mackay
Paul Thompson
Phil Manzanera

Graham Simpson
Roger Bunn
Dexter Lloyd
Brian Eno
David O’List
Rik Kenton
John Gustafson
Eddie Jobson
Paul Carrack
Alan Spenner
Gary Tibbs

Studio albums

Roxy Music
For Your Pleasure
Stranded
Country Life
Siren
Manifesto
Flesh + Blood
Avalon

Live albums

Viva!
The High Road
Heart Still Beating
Concert Classics
Concerto
Live

Compilation albums

Greatest Hits
Street Life: 20 Great Hits
The Ultimate Collection
More than This

Boxsets

The Thrill of It All
The Complete Studio Recordings

Singles

“Virginia Plain”
“Pyjamarama”
“Do the Strand”
“Street Life”
“All I Want Is You”
“The Thrill of It All”
“Love Is the Drug”
“Both Ends Burning”
“Trash”
“Dance Away”
“Angel Eyes”
“Over You”
“Oh Yeah”
“Same Old Scene”
“In the Midnight Hour”
“Jealous Guy”
“More Than This”
“Avalon”

Other songs

“Like a Hurricane”

Related articles

Discography
Velvet Goldmine
Chris Thomas
Peter Sinfield

Authority control

MusicBrainz: 2d4c6549-b060-44f6-9396-cc895f9c2c21

This arti
꿀밤

1995 All-Big Eight Conference football team

The 1995 All-Big Eight Conference football team consists of American football players chosen by various organizations for All-Big Eight Conference teams for the 1995 NCAA Division I-A football season. The selectors for the 1995 season included the Associated Press (AP) and the Big Eight Conference coaches (Coaches). The 1995 team was the final All-Big Eight football team due to the conference’s merger in 1996 with four teams from the Southwest Conference to form the Big 12 Conference.[1]

1995 Big 8 football standings

v
t
e

Conf
 
 
Overall

Team
W
 
L
 
T
 
 
W
 
L
 
T

#1 Nebraska $
7

0

0
 
 
12

0

0

#5 Colorado
5

2

0
 
 
10

2

0

#7 Kansas State
5

2

0
 
 
10

2

0

#9 Kansas
5

2

0
 
 
10

2

0

Oklahoma
2

5

0
 
 
5

5

1

Oklahoma State
2

5

0
 
 
4

8

0

Iowa State
1

6

0
 
 
3

8

0

Missouri
1

6

0
 
 
3

8

0

† – Bowl Alliance representative as champion

Rankings from AP Poll

Four teams from the Big Eight Conference finished among the top ten in the final AP Poll of the 1995 season, and players from those teams dominated the All-Big Eight selections. The four ranked teams were:

The 1995 Nebraska Cornhuskers football team (12–0), led by head coach Tom Osborne, won the national championship and led the conference with 15 players who received first- or second-team honors. Three Nebraska players were consensus first-team selections by both the AP and the Coaches: quarterback Tommie Frazier; defensive tackle Christian Peter; and defensive back Tyrone Williams.
The 1995 Colorado Buffaloes football team (10–2), led by head coach Rick Neuheisel, was ranked No. 5 in the final AP Poll and had 11 players who received first- or second-team All-Big Eight honors. Four Colorado players were consensus first-team selections: wide receiver Rae Carruth; offensive linemen Chris Naeole and Heath Irwin; and linebacker Matt Russell.
The 1995 Kansas State Wildcats football team (10–2), led by head coach Bill Snyder, was ranked No. 7 in the final AP Poll and had nine players who received All-Big Eight honors. Defensive lineman Tim Colston and defensive back Chris Canty were consensus first-team selections.
The 1995 Kansas Jayhawks football team (10–2), led by head coach Glen Mason, was ranked No. 9 in th
부산오피