Nina Catach

This article is an orphan, as no other articles link to it. Please introduce links to this page from related articles; try the Find link tool for suggestions. (April 2012)

This article may be expanded with text translated from the corresponding article in French. (January 2012) Click [show] for important translation instructions. 

View a machine-translated version of the French article.
Google’s machine translation is a useful starting point for translations, but translators must revise errors as necessary and confirm that the translation is accurate, rather than simply copy-pasting machine-translated text into the English Wikipedia.
Do not translate text that appears unreliable or low-quality. If possible, verify the text with references provided in the foreign-language article.
After translating, {{Translated|fr|Nina Catach}} must be added to the talk page to ensure copyright compliance.
For more guidance, see Wikipedia:Translation.

Nina Catach (born 1923 in Cairo, Egypt – died 1997 in Paris, France) was a French linguist and linguistic historian who specialized in the history of French orthography.[1] She published many notable books.
She had a son and a daughter, Irène Rosier-Catach, a linguist and philosopher, and Laurent Catach, an editor of Dictionnaire Le Robert.
Works[edit]

L’orthographe française, 1980
Orthographe et lexicographie, 1981
Les listes orthographiques de base du français, 1984
‘New linguistic approaches to a theory of writing’. In: Battestini, S.P.X. (ed.) Georgetown University Round Table on Languages and Linguistics 1986. Washington, DC: Georgetown University Press (1986), pp. 161–174.
Un Dictionnaire historique de l’orthographe française, Larousse, 1994

References[edit]

^ Honvault, Renée (2009). “Catach, Nina”. In Harro Stammerjohann. Lexicon Grammaticorum: A bio-bibliographical companion to the history of linguistics. Walter de Gruyter. pp. 272–3. ISBN 978-3-484-97112-7. 

Authority control

WorldCat Identities
VIAF: 261980493
LCCN: n82129303
ISNI: 0000 0001 1543 9516
GND: 124279724
SUDOC: 026772116
BNF: cb118955395 (data)

This article on a French linguist is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.

v
t
e

분당오피

MVN University

MVN University

Motto
Creating the leaders in higher education with core values.

Type
Non-Profit Private

Established
2012

Chancellor
Mrs. Santosh Sharma

Vice-Chancellor
Dr. J.V. Desai

Location
Palwal, Haryana, India

Campus
Rural

Affiliations
UGC, AIU, BCI, CoA, PCI

Website
mvn.edu.in

MVN University, Palwal (Delhi NCR Region) is a Private university. It was launched under Haryana Private University act. MVNU is part of Modern Vidya Niketan Society, the managing body. It was established in 2012. The university is covered under section 2(f) of the UGC 1956, and is empowered to award degrees as specified by UGC under section 22 of UGC act 1956. It offers wide range of undergraduate, postgraduate and doctoral programmes. The endeavor of management of MVN society that no brilliant student is denied education for want of money therefore the society has launched very liberal scholarship schemes.

Contents

1 Background
2 School of Engineering & Technology
3 School of Business management & Commerce
4 School of Computer & Information Science
5 School of Art, Science & Humanities
6 School of Law
7 School of Pharmaceutical Sciences
8 School of Education
9 Hostel and Campus
10 References

Background[edit]
The university was established by State Legislature under Haryana Private Universities Act 32 of 2006 (Amendment Act 2010). Currently, Mrs. Santosh Sharma is Chancellor of the university.
School of Engineering & Technology[edit]
School of engineering & Technology offers various courses like Bachelor of Technology, Master of Technology and Diploma in Civil engineering, Mechanical engineering, Computer Science & Engineering, Electronics & Communication Engineering. The school also offers Ph.D in Computer Science and Electronic & Communication engineering.
School of Business management & Commerce[edit]
The school offers BBA, MBA, B.Com, and M.Com programs.
School of Computer & Information Science[edit]
The school offers BCA, MCA, B.Sc. (Hons) in (CS), MCA (Lateral Entry), M.Sc(CS).
School of Art, Science & Humanities[edit]
Various courses like B.Sc., B.Sc. (Physics/Chemistry/Maths), M.Sc.(Maths) and BA(English) are offered by the school.
School of Law[edit]
BBA-LL.B, LL.B., LL.M. are offered by the school.
School of Pharmaceutical Sciences[edit]
The school offers D.Pharma. and B.Pharma.
School of Education[edit]
The school offers B.Ed. course.
Hostel and Campus[edit]
The university has 28 a
인천오피

USCGC Matagorda (WPB-1303)

For other ships with the same name, see USCGC Matagorda.

USCGC Matagorda (WPB-1303). Note the Short Range Prosecutor launch on the rear launching ramp.

History

United States

Name:
USCGC Matagorda (WPB-1303)

Namesake:
Matagorda Island in Texas

Builder:
Bollinger Machine Shop and Shipyard, Lockport, Louisiana

Commissioned:
24 April 1986

Status:
Inactive

Notes:
Taken out of service ca. December 2006

General characteristics

Class and type:
Island-class patrol boat

Displacement:
168 tons

Length:
110 ft (34 m)

Beam:
21 ft (6.4 m)

Draught:
7.3 ft (2.2 m)

Installed power:
5,596 horsepower (4.17 MW) sustained

Propulsion:
Two Caterpillar 3516 DITA diesel engines, two shafts

Speed:
29 knots (54 km/h; 33 mph)

Range:
3,928 nautical miles (7,275 km; 4,520 mi) at 10 knots (19 km/h; 12 mph)

Complement:
16 (2 officers, 14 enlisted personnel)

Sensors and
processing systems:
Hughes/Furuno SPS-73 I-band (navigation)

Armament:

1 × McDonnell Douglas 25-millimeter
2 × .50-caliber (12.7-millimeter) machine guns
SCCS-Lite combat data system

USCGC Matagorda (WPB-1303) is an Island-class patrol boat of the United States Coast Guard. She was commissioned 24 April 1986. Matagorda was one of eight of the 110-foot cutters to be modified under the Integrated Deepwater System Program aka. “Deepwater” to 123-foot. She was taken out of service about December 2006 due to problems with the Deepwater conversion.

Contents

1 Conversion
2 Sea trials
3 Sea trial results
4 Legal liability
5 Conclusion
6 References

Conversion[edit]
The United States Coast Guard Cutter Matagorda (WPB-1303) was part of the 110-foot Island-class patrol boat cutters. The vessel’s design was based off highly accredited patrol boats from Great Britain, the Vosper Thornycroft 33 metres (108 ft) patrol boat. It replaced the older 95-foot Cape-class cutter with these U.S. island-named cutters. Matagorda was built by Bollinger Shipyard on April 24, 1986, in Lockport, Louisiana. In 2004, as part of a program called Deepwater, the Coast Guard wanted to extend the life of the 110 foot Island-class cutters, stationed in Key West, Florida. The eight cutters being modified were the USCGC Matagorda (WPB-1303), USCGC Attu (WPB-1317), USCGC Metompkin (WPB-1325), USCGC Padre (WPB-1328), USCGC Manitou (WPB-1302), USCGC Monhegan (WPB-1305), USCGC Nunivak&#160
오피뷰

Sissoi Veliky

Sissoi Veliky (Russian: Сисой Великий) may refer to:

St. Sisoes the Great of Egypt, Saint of the Orthodox Church
Sissoi Veliky (1788), Russian battleship
Sissoi Veliky (1822), Russian battleship
Sissoi Veliky (1849), Russian battleship
Russian battleship Sissoi Veliky (1896), Russian battleship

This disambiguation page lists articles associated with the title Sissoi Veliky.
If an internal link led you here, you may wish to change the link to point directly to the intended article.

부천오피

Weroom

Weroom is the first international social network dedicated to flatsharing, it is a platform for those seeking or offering rooms in a flatshare. The company was launched in 2013 by Thomas Villeneuve.
With more than 300,000 users worldwide, Weroom has gained an international presence. After starting in Paris, it expanded into London and has gone on to list properties and users on a global scale.[1]

Contents

1 Origin
2 Concept and usages
3 History
4 Business model
5 Awards and prizes
6 References

Origin[edit]
Based on the fact that the flatsharing market consists of 1 million people in France and 10 million people across Europe, Thomas Villeneuve launched Weroom to fill this market. The service helps bring the community of flatsharers, landlords, tenants and agencies together to make finding a flatshare easier.[2]
Concept and usages[edit]
This platform allows users to see listings of properties and to find their future flatmates on a more personal level. Users are able to book their rooms online with the online booking system.[3]
History[edit]
Thomas Villeneuve and Isabelle George founded Weroom in 2013, in Paris.[4]
In early 2014, the start-up was backed up by the real-estate group, Nexity, who detains 80% of its capital.[5] In August 2014, Weroom opened up another office in London.[6]
Business model[edit]
The concept is born from a sharing economy. It is structured to act as the middle ground between offer (agencies, networks, landlords) and demand (students, young professionals, mobile professionals, seniors).[7]
Awards and prizes[edit]

In March 2014, Weroom was included in the top 100 Red Herring Awards.[8] The company is now ranked in amongst the most innovative companies in Europe.

References[edit]

^ Weroom: Flatsharing social network targets expansion across Europe, IB Times, June 1, 2015
^ La start-up du jour : Weroom regroupe les colocataires par affinités, FrenchWeb, March 4, 2014
^ Weroom – corporate presentation, Usine Digitale, March 14, 2014
^ Company Overview of Weroom SAS, Bloomberg, October 05, 2015
^ Nexity se lance dans la colocation avec Weroom.com, Les Echos, February 2, 2014
^ 1 Français sur 6 vit en colocation selon WeRoom.com, Nouvel Obs, November 11, 2014
^ Logement : Weroom, le réseau social de la colocation, le Parisien, June 19, 2014
^ Colocation : Weroom lauréat du Top 100 Red Herring Europe Award, Business Immo, April 14, 2014

꿀밤

Portlethen railway station

This article does not cite any sources. Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (December 2009) (Learn how and when to remove this template message)

Portlethen

Location

Place
Portlethen

Local authority
Aberdeenshire

Coordinates
57°03′41″N 2°07′41″W / 57.0614°N 2.1280°W / 57.0614; -2.1280Coordinates: 57°03′41″N 2°07′41″W / 57.0614°N 2.1280°W / 57.0614; -2.1280

Grid reference
NO923967

Operations

Station code
PLN

Managed by
Abellio ScotRail

Number of platforms
2

Live arrivals/departures, station information and onward connections
from National Rail Enquiries

Annual rail passenger usage*

2011/12
19,078

2012/13
28,000

2013/14
48,174

2014/15
57,152

2015/16
56,324

History

1 April 1850
Opened

11 June 1956
Closed

17 May 1985
Reopened

National Rail – UK railway stations

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

* Annual estimated passenger usage based on sales of tickets in stated financial year(s) which end or originate at Portlethen from Office of Rail and Road statistics. Methodology may vary year on year.

UK Railways portal

Portlethen railway station serves the town of Portlethen in Aberdeenshire, Scotland. The station was opened on 1 April 1850. After closure in 1956, the station was reopened nearly 30 years later on 17 May 1985.
Station usage[edit]
In the year 2004-2005, Portlethen station attracted just under 11,000 (combined entry/exit) passengers,[clarification needed] including 3,746 (combined entry/exit) season ticket journeys. By 2006-07, the annual number of passengers had increased to over 21,000 and by 2012-13 carried around 28,000 passengers per year. In 2014/15 that had increased to 57,152.
Portlethen had a somewhat limited service, with trains only calling early in the morning and evening peaks and at night times with large gaps at certain times during the day, but an improved timetable has accounted for much of the growth in recent years. In the May 2016 timetable, there are 9 northbound & 11 southbound departures on Mondays to Saturdays and 5 each way on Sundays.[1] Trains run southbound to both Glasgow Queen Street via Perth and Edinburgh Waverley, though certain evening trains only run as far as Stonehaven.
Future Improvements[edit]
Service frequencies are to be improved here from 2018 as part of a timetable recast funded by Transport Sc
오피와우

Sam Tolchard

Sam Tolchard

Personal information

Nationality
 England

Born
(1989-05-27) 27 May 1989 (age 27)
Torquay, England

Height
5 ft 5 in (165 cm)

Weight
52 kg (115 lb)

Sport

Sport
Bowls

Club
Torquay United (indoors)
Kings BC (outdoors)

Medal record

Representing  England

Men’s lawn bowls

Commonwealth Games

2014 Glasgow
Men’s pairs

Sam Tolchard (born 27 May 1989) is an English international lawn and indoor bowler.[1]
He competed for England in the men’s pairs at the 2014 Commonwealth Games[2] where he won a bronze medal. [3][4]
References[edit]

^ “Profile”. Henselite. 
^ “Glasgow 2014: Sam Tolchard aims to banish 2010 bowls nightmare”. BBC News. 12 June 2014. Retrieved 10 May 2015. 
^ “Glasgow 2014 profile”. Retrieved 14 September 2014. 
^ “Tolchard makes up for his Delhi dismay with bronze in men’s pairs”. Western Morning News. 28 July 2014. Retrieved 10 May 2015. 

This biographical article relating to a United Kingdom sportsperson is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.

v
t
e

분당오피

Belgium women’s national rugby sevens team

Belgium

Union
Belgian Rugby Federation

Nickname(s)
“Lionnes”

Captain(s)
Margaux Lalli

Team kit

The Belgium women’s national rugby union team (sevens) are a national sporting side of Belgium, representing them at rugby union.
History[edit]
European Women’s Sevens Championship Division A 2013: Champion.
First participation in de Sevens Women Grand Prix Series in 2014. Lionesses finish in the tenth place in both rounds of the Grand prix and finally eleventh overall.

Team composition

Players
Club

Emilie Musch
BEL-Boitsfort Rugby Club

Carmen De Donder
BEL- Dendermonde

Cathy De Geyter
BEL-Boitsfort Rugby Club

Charlotte Van Eecke
BEL- Dendermonde

Ciska De Grave
BEL-Antwerp

Gaëlle Portier
BEL-Coq Mosan

Evelien Rosier
BEL-Leuven

Sytske D’Haeseleir
FRA-Ovalie Caennaise

Margaux Stevins
BEL-Boitsfort Rugby Club

Margaux Lalli
BEL-Frameries

Cécile Blondiau
BEL-Soignies

Aude Risselin
BEL-Boitsfort Rugby Club

External links[edit]

Belgian Rugby Federation – Official Site

v
t
e

Rugby union in Belgium

Governing body

Belgian Rugby Federation

National teams

Belgium
Women’s
7’s

Competitions

Belgian Elite League
Belgian Cup
Belgian Super Cup
Four Nations
European Nations Cup (rugby union)

v
t
e

Women’s national rugby sevens teams

WR Women’s Sevens core teams

Australia
Canada
England
Fiji
France
Ireland
Japan
New Zealand
Russia
Spain
United States

Other teams

Argentina
Austria
Barbados
Belgium
Botswana
Brazil
Bulgaria
Burundi
Chile
China
Colombia
Cook Islands
Croatia
Finland
Germany
Ghana
Great Britain
Guam
Guyana
Hong Kong
India
Iran
Israel
Italy
Ivory Coast
Jamaica
Kazakhstan
Kenya
Lithuania
Madagascar
Malaysia
Malta
Mexico
Moldova
Morocco
Netherlands
New Caledonia
Nigeria
Papua New Guinea
Paraguay
Peru
Philippines
Poland
Portugal
Rwanda
Saint Lucia
Saint Vincent
Samoa
Scotland
Senegal
Serbia
Singapore
Solomon Islands
South Africa
South Korea
Spain
Sri Lanka
Sweden
Switzerland
Thailand
Tonga
Trinidad and Tobago
Tunisia
Uganda
Ukraine
Uruguay
Venezuela
Wales
Zambia
Zimbabwe

Competitions

Rugby World Cup Sevens
World Rugby Women’s Sevens Series
IRB Women’s Sevens Challenge Cup

v
t
e

National sports teams of Belgium

Bandy
Baseball
Basketball

F
M
F-U19
F-U17
F-3×3
M-U19
M-U17
M-3×3

Beach soccer
Bobsleigh
Cricket

F
M

Cyclo-cross
Field hockey

F
M

Football

F
M
M-U15
M-U16
M-U17
M-U18
M-U19
M-U20
M-U21
일산오피

Indian paisa

This article is about the subunit of the Indian rupee. For other uses, see Paisa.
Indian paisa (plural: paise) is  1⁄100 (one-hundredth) subdivision of the Indian rupee. The paisa was first introduced on 1 April 1957 after decimalisation of the Indian rupee. As of 30 June 2011, except for 50 paisa coins, all other paisa coins had been demonetized.[citation needed]
In 1955, the Government of India first amended the “Indian Coinage Act” and adopted the “metric system for coinage”. From 1957 to 1964, the Paisa was called “Naya Paisa” (New Paisa) and on 1 June 1964, the term “Naya” was dropped and the denomination was named “Paisa”. Paisa has been issued in 1, 2, 3, 5, 10, 20, 25 and 50 paisa coins.

Contents

1 History
2 Coins

2.1 Naya Paisa Series (1957-1964)
2.2 Paisa Series (1964 – present)
2.3 Mint mark

3 See also
4 References
5 External links

History[edit]
Main article: Coins of the Indian rupee
Prior to 1957, Indian rupee was not decimalised and the rupee from 1835 to 1957 was further divided into 16 annas. Each anna was further divided to four Indian pices and each pice into three Indian pies till 1947 when the pie was demonetized.[1][2]

Denomination
Corresponding value
From
To
Comments

One Indian rupee
Sixteen Indian anna
1835
1947

1947
1950
The Frozen Series

1950
1957
The Anna Series

Hundred paise
1957
1964
Naya Paisa Series

1964
Present
Except 50 paise, rest all paise, anna, pice and pies coins demonetized.

One Indian anna
Four Indian pice
1835
1947

1947
1950
The Frozen Series.

1950
1957
The Anna Series. Anna and pice demonetized in 1957.

One Indian pice
Three Indian pies
1835
1947
Pies demonetized in 1947.

One Indian rupee = 100 paise = 16 anna = 64 pice = 192 pies.[1]

Coins[edit]
Naya Paisa Series (1957-1964)[edit]

Naya Paisa Series

Image
Value
Technical parameters
Description
Year of minting
Monetary
status

Obverse
Reverse
Weight
Diameter
Thickness
Metal
Edge
Obverse
Reverse
First
Last

colspan=”2″
1 Naya
Paisa
1.5 g
16 mm
1 mm
Bronze
Plain
State Emblem of India and country name
in Hindi and English.
Face-value and year.
1957
1962
Demonetized.[3]

colspan=”2″
2 Naya
Paise
2.95 g
18 mm
1.80 mm
Cupronickel
Smooth
1957
1963
Demonetized.[4]

5 Naya
Paisa

10 Naya
Paisa

20 Naya
Paisa

50 Naya
Paisa

Paisa Series (1964 – present)[edit]

Paisa – Aluminum Series

Image
Value
Technical parameters
Description
Year of minting
Monetary
status

Obverse
Reve
강남오피

Association of Private Higher Education Institutions of Thailand

Association of Private Higher Education Institutions of Thailand

Abbreviation
APHEIT

Formation
1979

Type
NGO

Purpose
To establish higher level of cooperation among educational institutions in Thailand

Region served

Thailand

Website
http://apheit.org/

Association of Private Higher Education Institutions of Thailand (APHEIT, Thai: สมาคมสถาบันอุดมศึกษาเอกชนแห่งประเทศไทย) established in 1979, is a non-profit association founded by a group of private higher education institutions in Thailand[1][2] to establish and promote cooperation among private higher education institutions in the country. APHEIT is recognized by Ministry of Education (Thailand) as one of the organizations that plays an important role in Thailand’s university administration.[3]

History[edit]
In 1967, six administrators from private colleges established a club in which they met monthly to discuss and exchange views on administrative problems in each institution. This club was later renamed to Association of Private Colleges of Thailand on November 18, 1977. On July 23, 1979, it was again renamed to Association of Private Higher Education of Thailand to conform with the Private Higher Education Institution Act of 1979.[4]
Members[edit]
There are 65 member institutions:

Arsom Silp Institute of the Arts
Asia-Pacific International University
Assumption University (Thailand) (ABAC)
Bangkok Suvarnabhumi University
Bangkok Thonburi University
Bangkok University
Chalermkarnchana College
Chalermkarnchana Rayong College
Chaopraya University
Chiangrai College
Christian University of Thailand
Chulabhorn Graduate Institute
College of Asian Scholars
Dhurakij Pundit University
Dusit Thani College
Eastern Asia University
Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences Huachiew Chalermprakiet University
Hatyai University
International Buddhist College
Kasem Bundit University
Krirk University
Lampang Inter-Tech College
Lumnamping College
Mahanakorn University of Technology
Nakhon Ratchasima College
Nation University
North Bangkok University
North Chiang Mai University
North Eastern University
Panyapiwat Institute of Management
Pathumthani University
Payap University
Phitsanulok University
Phanomwan College of Technology
Rajapruk University
Rangsit University
Ratchaphruek College
Ratchathani University
Rattana Bundit University
Saengtham College
Saint John’s University
Saint Louis College
Santapol College
Shinawatra University

일산오피